Causes of developmental delays

There’s no one cause of developmental delays, but there are some risk factors. They include: Complications at birth: Being born prematurely; low birth weight; not getting enough oxygen at birth Environmental issues: Lead poisoning; poor nutrition; exposure to alcohol or drugs before birth; trauma Other medical conditions: Chronic ear infections; vision problems; illnesses, conditions, or injuries that have a significant and long-term effect on kids’ day-to-day activities. https://www.understood.org/en/articles/what-you-need-to-know-about-developmental-delays

Lots of different things can cause children to develop more slowly than others. Developmental delay might happen because of genetic conditions like Down syndrome or because of complications during pregnancy and birth, like premature birth. Other causes for short-term delays include physical illness, long periods in hospital, and family stress. In many cases, the cause of developmental delay isn’t known. https://raisingchildren.net.au/guides/a-z-health-reference/developmental-delay#causes-of-developmental-delay-nav-title

Causes

Sometimes the cause of a developmental delay isn’t known, but there are many things that can affect a child’s development. These include: birth complications, low birth weight, premature birth, or lack of oxygen for example brain injury environmental conditions, like: lack of loving, interactive relationships with parents or caregivers trauma family violence parental abuse of drugs or alcohol before or after birth. genetic conditions, like Down syndrome. Short-term delays can be caused by physical illness, chronic ear infections, vision problems, injuries, long periods in hospital, or family stress. Health professionals usually only use the term developmental delay until they can figure out what’s causing the delay – after that they’ll use a name that better explains the condition. Developmental delay can be short-term, or it can be an early sign of other conditions, like: a language delay learning disabilities like dyslexia and dyspraxia a hearing impairment a visual impairment Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) Down syndrome intellectual disability cerebral palsy fetal alcohol syndrome brain injury/trauma.