Newborn (3-5 days)

KidsHealth / Parents / Your Child’s Checkup: 3 to 5 Days

What to Expect During This Visit The doctor and/or nurse will probably:

  1. Check your baby’s weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on a growth chart.
  2. Ask questions, address any concerns, and offer advice about how your baby is:

Feeding. Newborns should be fed whenever they seem hungry. Breastfed infants eat about every 1–3 hours, and formula-fed infants eat about every 2–4 hours. Your doctor or nurse can watch as you breastfeed and offer help with any problems. Burp your baby midway through a feeding and again at the end.

Peeing and pooping. Newborns should have about 6 wet diapers a day. The number of poopy diapers varies, but most newborns have 3 or 4 soft bowel movements a day. Tell your doctor if you have any concerns about your newborn’s bowel movements.

Sleeping. A newborn may sleep 14 to 17 hours or more in 24 hours, waking up often (day and night) to breastfeed or take a bottle. Breastfed babies usually wake to eat every 1–3 hours, while formula-fed babies may sleep longer, waking every 2–4 hours to eat (formula takes longer to digest so babies feel fuller longer). Newborns should not sleep more than 4 hours between feedings until they have good weight gain, usually within the first few weeks. After that, it’s OK if a baby sleeps for longer stretches.

Developing. In the first month, babies should:

  • pay attention to faces or bright objects 8–12 inches (20–30 cm) away
  • respond to sound — they may quiet down, blink, turn head, startle, or cry
  • hold arms and legs in a flexed position
  • move arms and legs equally
  • lift head briefly when on stomach (babies should be placed on the stomach only while awake and under supervision)
  • have strong newborn reflexes, such as: rooting and sucking:
    • turns toward, then sucks breast/bottle nipple grasp: tightly grabs hold of a finger placed within
    • the palm fencer’s pose: straightens arm when head is turned to that side and bends opposite arm
    • Moro reflex (startle response): throws out arms and legs, then curls them in when startled

3. Do an exam with your baby undressed with you present. This exam will include an eye exam, listening to your baby’s heart and feeling pulses, inspecting the umbilical cord, and checking the hips.

4. Do screening tests. Your doctor will review the screening tests from the hospital and repeat tests, if needed. If a hearing test wasn’t done then, your baby will have one now.

5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect infants from serious childhood illnesses, so it’s important that your baby get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your next routine visit at 1 month: Feeding Continue to feed whenever your baby is hungry. Pay attention to signs that your baby is full, such as turning away from the nipple or bottle and closing the mouth. Don’t give solid foods or juice.

Don’t put cereal in your baby’s bottle unless directed to by your doctor. If you breastfeed: Help your baby latch on correctly: mouth opened wide, tongue down, with as much breast in the mouth as possible. Continue to take a prenatal vitamin or multivitamin daily. Ask your doctor about vitamin D drops for your baby. Don’t use a bottle or pacifier until nursing is well established (usually about 1 month). If you formula-feed: Give your baby iron-fortified formula.

Follow the formula package’s instructions when making and storing bottles. Don’t prop bottles or put your baby to bed with a bottle. Talk to your doctor before switching formulas. Routine Care Wash your hands before handling the baby and avoid people who may be sick. Keep the diaper below the umbilical cord so the stump can dry. The umbilical cord usually falls off in 10–14 days. For circumcised boys, put petroleum jelly on the penis or diaper’s front. Give sponge baths until the umbilical cord falls off and a boy’s circumcision heals. Make sure the water isn’t too hot — test it with your wrist first. Use fragrance-free soaps and lotions. Hold your baby and be attentive to their needs. You can’t spoil a newborn. Sing, talk, and read to your baby. Babies learn best by interacting with people. It’s normal for infants to have fussy periods. But for some, crying can be excessive, lasting several hours a day. If an otherwise well baby develops colic, it usually starts when they’re around 3 weeks old.

Call your baby’s doctor if your infant has a fever of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher, taken in your baby’s bottom. Call the doctor if your baby is acting sick, isn’t eating, isn’t peeing or pooping, looks yellow, or has increasing redness or pus around umbilical cord or circumcision. Don’t give medicine to an infant younger than 2 months old without talking to your doctor first. It’s common for new moms to feel tired and overwhelmed at times. But if these feelings are intense, or you feel sad, moody, or anxious, call your doctor. Talk to your doctor if you’re worried about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker. Safety To reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): Breastfeed your baby. Let your baby sleep in your room in a bassinet or crib next to the bed until your baby’s first birthday or for at least 6 months, when the risk of SIDS is highest. Always place your baby to sleep on a firm mattress on their back in a crib or bassinet without any crib bumpers, blankets, quilts, pillows, or plush toys. Avoid overheating by keeping the room temperature comfortable. Don’t overbundle your baby. Consider putting your baby to sleep sucking on a pacifier.

If you’re breastfeeding, wait until breastfeeding is established before introducing the pacifier. Don’t smoke or use e-cigarettes. Don’t let anyone else smoke or vape around your baby. Always put your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat. Never leave your baby alone in a car. While your baby is awake, don’t leave your little one unattended, especially on high surfaces or in the bath. Never shake your baby — it can cause bleeding in the brain and even death. If you are ever worried that you will hurt your baby, put your baby in the crib or bassinet for a few minutes.

Call a friend, relative, or your health care provider for help. Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. Sunscreens are not recommended for infants younger than 6 months. However, you may use a small amount of sunscreen on an infant younger than 6 months if shade and clothing don’t offer enough protection.

What is 3-7 Day Well-Baby Checkup: Overview, Benefits, and Expected Results

Definition and Overview

A 3-7 day well-baby checkup is a visit to a pediatrician during the baby’s first few days outside the hospital. This is usually scheduled after the initial consultation conducted within 48 hours after discharge, depending on the overall condition of the baby. Babies are at their most vulnerable state during the first few days after birth especially because they are very prone to infections. Meanwhile, parents, especially first-timers, also experience different challenges, particularly since they don’t have medical professionals they can rely on 24/7.

The checkup provides pediatricians (doctors who specialize in natal and childcare) an opportunity to monitor the baby’s health and growth, as well as help the parents cope with the ever-changing needs of babies and dynamics of childcare. Who Should Undergo and Expected Results The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents bring their newborn to their pediatricians within 3 to 5 days after they have left the hospital. In some cases, this may be extended to up to two weeks depending on the overall health and condition of the baby. Regardless, this checkup is very important as it ensures the health of the newborn.

There are also instances when the well-baby checkup becomes more essential, if not mandatory and these include:

  • The baby is born pre-term. Also known as preemies, premature babies face extra and tougher challenges than full-term babies. These include lung and breathing problems. The farther the baby is from his due date, the higher the chances that complications may arise.
  • The baby has been diagnosed with a medical condition. These may include congenital defects, inherited disorders that have been detected during the prenatal genetic screening and jaundice. As an extra precaution and to plan any necessary treatment, the pediatrician has to see the baby as soon as possible.
  • The mother is having a hard time feeding. Newborns get their nourishment from milk. Mothers have a choice between breast or formula milk. Whatever they pick, it’s important they don’t have problems with feeding.
  • The baby is undergoing treatment. If the hospital is implementing a treatment protocol before the baby is discharged, the pediatrician will see the baby as soon as possible to check on his progress and recovery.

How Does the Procedure Work?

Before the baby is discharged from the hospital, the pediatrician will inform the parent of the first checkup, which may be within 3 to 7 days (although the common period is 3 to 5 days). Usually, the parents are given a baby booklet by the hospital, which serves as a guide during checkups and immunization.

During the first baby checkup, the parents may be asked to fill out questionnaires, forms, and other papers pertaining to the baby’s health, development, maternal care and insurance. The baby’s statistics like the head circumference, weight and length will then be obtained either by a nurse or the pediatrician.

The pediatrician will also check on the baby’s:

  • Behavior – Parents and doctors do not expect major milestones at this age, but babies may already know how to grasp and suck.
  • Digestion – Pediatricians often focus on two things during this checkup: feeding and bowel movements. Babies this young should have several nappy changes within the day since they are fed in short intervals (every 2 to 3 hours).
  • Sleep – Newborns have erratic sleeping schedules as they are still getting accustomed to their new surroundings. The checkup is also a good opportunity for pediatricians to provide recommendations to avoid serious sleeping problems like SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).
  • Overall health – This can be accomplished through a physical exam and a series of blood tests.

Possible Risks and Complications

Some parents may be afraid to ask questions or raise concerns, believing they are unnecessary or downright nonsense. However, when it comes to the baby’s health, no question should be dismissed or considered irrelevant. Health practitioners like pediatricians and nurses should promote a healthy discussion with emphasis on the parents’ active participation during every checkup. If necessary, the parent may be provided with a guide sheet or a questionnaire, which can be used to discover health issues of the baby that are previously unknown or have not been brought up by the parents before.

1st Week Checkup Checklist: 3 to 5 days old

Congratulations on the birth of your new baby!

For many parents, the first visit to the pediatrician is also their newborn’s first trip away from home. Don’t worry—we’ve got you covered with what questions to ask, what paperwork to remember, and what to expect at your baby’s first checkup.

✅ What to bring Hospital paperwork—including information about your baby’s discharge weight or complications during pregnancy or birth.

✅ Immunizations Your baby will receive the Hepatitis B (HBV) vaccine if they did not receive it in the hospital. (The AAP recommends newborns receive their first dose of vaccine within the first 24 hours of birth.)

✅ Screenings Your pediatrician will review the results of two screenings that all babies receive in the hospital for hearing and blood. Based on the results, your pediatrician may rescreen or recommend a referral to a specialist.

✅Development & feeding Your doctor will measure and weigh your baby to make sure their growth is on track, observe their development and behavior, and perform a physical exam.

Questions your pediatrician may ask

  • Does your baby receive breast milk, iron-fortified formula, or a combination of the two?
  • If breastfeeding, do you have support from a lactation consultant? The first few weeks of breastfeeding can be an adjustment, but try to stick with it! (The AAP recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for your baby for about 6 months. When you add solid foods to your baby’s diet, continue breastfeeding until at least 12 months. You can continue to breastfeed after 12 months if you and your baby desire.)
  • Is your breastfed baby getting a vitamin D supplement? (The AAP recommends 400 IU of supplemental vitamin D daily, beginning in the first few days of life.)

Questions you may have

  • How many diapers should I be changing?
  • How long is formula good after making it?
  • How long is breast milk good after pumping it?
  • How well can my baby see​?

✅Safety Questions your pediatrician may ask How are you feeling? If you are having postpartum issues with breastfeeding, anxiety, or sadness, or anything else, please feel free to discuss it with your baby’s pediatrician. Where does your baby sleep? Here are great tips from the AAP on keeping your sleeping baby safe. Questions you may have Are my baby’s umbilical cord and/or circumcision healing as expected? Am I preparing bottles safely? When is it safe to bathe​ my baby? What should I do if my baby has a fever? Can you show me how to safely use a rectal thermometer to take my baby’s temperature?

✅ Communication Never hesitate to call your pediatrician’s office with any questions or concerns—even if you know the office is closed. If your pediatrician is unable to see you but believes your baby should be examined, they will advise you on the most appropriate place for your baby to receive care and how quickly your baby should be seen.

Your Child’s Checkup: 3 to 5 Days

What to Expect During This Visit The doctor and/or nurse will probably:

1. Check your baby’s weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts.

2. Ask questions, address any concerns, and offer advice about how your baby is: Feeding. Newborns should be fed whenever they seem hungry. Breastfed infants eat about every 1–3 hours, and formula-fed infants eat about every 2–4 hours. Your doctor or nurse can watch as you breastfeed and offer help with any problems. Burp your baby midway through a feeding and again at the end. Peeing and pooping. Newborns should have about six wet diapers a day. The number of poopy diapers varies, but most newborns have 3 or 4 soft bowel movements a day. Tell your doctor if you have any concerns about your newborn’s bowel movements. Sleeping. A newborn may sleep up to 18 or 19 hours a day, waking up often (day and night) to breastfeed or take a bottle. Breastfed babies usually wake to eat every 1–3 hours, while formula-fed babies may sleep longer, waking every 2–4 hours to eat (formula takes longer to digest so babies feel fuller longer). Newborns should not sleep more than 4 hours between feedings until they have good weight gain, usually within the first few weeks. After that, it’s OK if a baby sleeps for longer stretches. Developing. In the first month, babies should: pay attention to faces or bright objects 8–12 inches (20–30 cm) away respond to sound — they may quiet down, blink, turn head, startle, or cry hold arms and legs in a flexed position move arms and legs equally lift head briefly when on stomach (babies should only be placed on the stomach while awake and under supervision) have strong newborn reflexes, such as: rooting and sucking: turns toward, then sucks breast/bottle nipple grasp: tightly grabs hold of a finger placed within the palm fencer’s pose: straightens arm when head is turned to that side and bends opposite arm Moro reflex (startle response): throws out arms and legs, then curls them in when startled

3. Do a physical exam with your baby undressed with you present. This exam will include an eye exam, listening to your baby’s heart and feeling pulses, inspecting the umbilical cord, and checking the hips.

4. Do screening tests. Your doctor will review the screening tests from the hospital and repeat tests, if needed. If a hearing test wasn’t done then, your baby will have one now.

5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect infants from serious childhood illnesses, so it’s important that your baby get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect.

Looking Ahead

Here are some things to keep in mind until your next routine visit at 1 month:

Feeding

  • Continue to feed your baby when he or she is hungry. Pay attention to signs that your baby is full, such as turning away from the nipple or bottle and closing the mouth.
  • Don’t give solid foods or juice.
  • Don’t put cereal in your baby’s bottle unless directed to by your doctor.

If you breastfeed:

  • Help your baby latch on correctly:
    • mouth opened wide,
    • tongue down, with as much breast in the mouth as possible.
  • Continue to take a prenatal vitamin or multivitamin daily.
  • Ask your doctor about vitamin D drops for your baby.
  • Don’t use a bottle or pacifier until nursing is well established (usually about 1 month).
  • If you formula-feed:
    • Give your baby iron-fortified formula.
    • Follow the formula package’s instructions when making and storing bottles.
    • Don’t prop bottles or put your baby to bed with a bottle.
    • Talk to your doctor before switching formulas.

Routine Care

  • Wash your hands before handling the baby and avoid people who may be sick.
  • Keep the diaper below the umbilical cord so the stump can dry. The umbilical cord usually falls off in 10–14 days.
  • For circumcised boys, put petroleum jelly on the penis or diaper’s front.
  • Give sponge baths until the umbilical cord falls off and a boy’s circumcision heals. Make sure the water isn’t too hot — test it with your wrist first.
  • Use fragrance-free soaps and lotions.
  • Hold your baby and be attentive to his or her needs. You can’t spoil a newborn.
  • Sing, talk, and read to your baby. Babies learn best by interacting with people.
  • It’s normal for infants to have fussy periods, but for some, crying can be excessive, lasting several hours a day. If a baby develops colic, it usually starts in an otherwise well baby around 3 weeks of age.
  • Call your baby’s doctor if your infant has a fever or is acting sick, isn’t eating, isn’t peeing, or isn’t pooping. Don’t give medicine to an infant younger than 2 months old without talking to your doctor first.
  • It’s common for new moms to feel tired and overwhelmed at times. But if these feelings are intense, or you feel sad, moody, or anxious, call your doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor if you’re concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.

Safety

To reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS):

  • Breastfeed your baby.
  • Let your baby sleep in your room in a bassinet or crib next to the bed until your baby’s first birthday or for at least 6 months, when the risk of SIDS is highest.
  • Always place your baby to sleep on a firm mattress on his or her back in a crib or bassinet without any crib bumpers, blankets, quilts, pillows, or plush toys.
  • Avoid overheating by keeping the room temperature comfortable.
  • Don’t over bundle your baby.
  • Consider putting your baby to sleep sucking on a pacifier.
  • If you’re breastfeeding, wait until breastfeeding is established before introducing the pacifier. Don’t smoke or use e-cigarettes.
  • Don’t let anyone else smoke or vape around your baby.
  • Always put your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat.
  • Never leave your baby alone in a car.
  • While your baby is awake, don’t leave your little one unattended, especially on high surfaces or in the bath.
  • Never shake your baby — it can cause bleeding in the brain and even death.
  • Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible.
  • Sunscreens are not recommended for infants younger than 6 months. However, you may use a small amount of sunscreen on an infant younger than 6 months if shade and clothing don’t offer enough protection.

3 To 5 Days After Birth

Your pediatrician will likely ask to see baby sometime in his first week to make sure everything still seems to be going well. The doctor will measure baby to make sure his growth is on track (and he’s eating enough), observe his development and behavior, and perform another physical exam. If your baby hasn’t gone through a metabolic/hemoglobin screening yet, he will at this appointment.

Congratulations! Your baby is finally here.

Newborns are wonderful, but exhausting! Having friends or family around to provide extra help and support can be very helpful. Make sure all visitors wash their hands well. Your baby’s first visit to our office takes place during his or her first week of life, usually 1-2 days after you are discharged from the hospital.

We do a lot at this visit, including:

  • Check your baby’s weight.
  • Monitor for signs of jaundice.
  • Check to see how your baby is feeding.
  • Provide a personalized breastfeeding consultation with one of our Lactation Consultants.

Answer questions about your new baby.

  • Immunizations:
    • HepB#1 (if not given in hospital)
  • Tests/Screens/Assessments:
    • None Helpful Info: Caring for Your Newborn

View Sources

KidsHealth / Parents / Your Child’s Checkup: 3 to 5 Days Your Child’s Checkup: 3 to 5 Days Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD

https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/checkup-2weeks.html

What is 3-7 Day Well-Baby Checkup: Overview, Benefits, and Expected Results

https://www.docdoc.com/medical-information/procedures/3-7-day-well-baby-checkup

1st Week Checkup Checklist: 3 to 5 days old

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/Your-Childs-Checkups/Pages/Your-Checkup-Checklist-Newborn-Visit-2-to-5-days-old.aspx

Your Child’s Checkup: 3 to 5 Days

https://www.connecticutchildrens.org/health-library/en/parents/checkup-2weeks/

3 To 5 Days After Birth

https://www.thebump.com/a/new-baby-doctor-visit-checklist

Congratulations! Your baby is finally here.

https://sfbaypeds.com/Appointments/Well-Child-Visits-(1)