Two Year

Your Child’s Checkup: 2 Years (24 Months)

What to Expect During This Visit

Your doctor and/or nurse will probably:

1. Check your child’s weight, height, and head circumference and plot the measurements on a growth chart. Your doctor will also calculate and plot your child’s body mass index (BMI).

2. Do a screening (test) that helps with the early identification of autism.

3. Ask questions, address concerns, and provide guidance about how your toddler is:

Eating. Don’t be surprised if your toddler skips meals occasionally or loves something one day and won’t touch it the next. Schedule 3 meals and 2–3 healthy snacks a day. You’re in charge of the menu, but let your child be in charge of how much they eat.

Peeing and pooping. Most children are ready to begin potty training when they’re 2–3 years old. You may notice signs that your child is ready to start potty training, such as: showing interest in the toilet (watching a parent or sibling in the bathroom, sitting on potty chair) staying dry for longer periods pulling pants down and up with assistance connecting feeling of having to go with peeing and pooping communicating that diaper is wet or dirty

Sleeping.

Generally 2-year-olds need about 11–14 hours of sleep a day, including naps.

Developing.

By 2 years, it’s common for many children to:

  • say more than 50 words
  • put 2 words together to form a sentence (“I go!”)
  • be understood at least half the time
  • follow a 2-step command (“Pick up the ball and bring it to me.”)
  • run well
  • kick a ball
  • walk down stairs
  • make lines and circular scribbles
  • play alongside other children

4. Do an exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, tooth exam, listening to the heart and lungs, and paying attention to your toddler’s motor skills, use of language, and behavior.

5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it’s important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect.

6. Order tests. Your doctor may order tests for lead, anemia, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis, if needed.

Looking Ahead

Here are some things to keep in mind until your child’s next checkup at 30 months:

Feeding

  • Food “jags” are common during the toddler years. Even if your child seems to get stuck on one food, continue to offer a variety.
  • Let your child decide what to eat, and when they’re full. Serve healthy snacks and avoid sugary drinks.
  • Switch to low-fat or nonfat milk, or a fortified, unsweetened soy beverage. Offer other dairy products, like yogurt, that are low-fat or nonfat.
  • Limit 100% juice to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day.
  • Avoid foods that are high in sugar, salt, and fat and low in nutrients.

4. Avoid foods that may cause choking, such as hot dogs, whole grapes, raw veggies, nuts, and hard fruits or candy.

Learning

  • Toddlers learn by interacting with parents, caregivers, and their environment.
  • Limit screen time (TV, computers, tablets, or other screens) to no more than 1–2 hours a day of quality children’s programming.
  • Watch with your child.
  • Have a safe play area and allow plenty of time for exploring and active play.
  • Play often together.
  • Read to your child every day.

Routine Care & Safety

  • Let your child brush their teeth with your guidance. Twice a day, use a small amount of toothpaste (about the size of a pea) with a soft toothbrush. Go over any areas that may have been missed. If you haven’t already, schedule a dentist visit. To help prevent cavities, the doctor or dentist may brush fluoride varnish on your child’s teeth 2–4 times a year.
  • Look for the signs that your child is ready to start potty training. If they don’t show interest, it’s OK to wait before trying again. A child who uses the potty and is accident-free during the day may still need a diaper at night.
  • Set reasonable and consistent rules. Use praise to encourage good behavior and be positive when redirecting unwanted behavior
  • Tantrums are common at this age, and tend to be worse when children are tired or hungry. Try to head off tantrums before they happen — find a distraction or remove your child from frustrating situations.
  • Don’t spank your child. Children don’t make the connection between spanking and the behavior you’re trying to correct. You can use a brief time-out instead.
  • Keep your child in a rear-facing car seat until they reach the highest weight or height limit allowed by the seat’s manufacturer. Previous advice was to turn kids around by age 2. Now, safety experts say to do this based on a child’s size, not age. So, small children can stay rear-facing until age 3 or 4.
  • Watch closely when your child is playing outside and on playground equipment. Make sure your child always wears a helmet when riding a tricycle or is in a seat on an adult bicycle.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids can’t get to the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you’re concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker. T
  • hese checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.

The 2-Year (24-Month) Well-Baby Visit

Here’s what will happen at your little one’s 2-year well-baby visit, including the physical checkup, developmental milestones and shots.

What’s new when you’re 2? Plenty! Your toddler’s curiosity, resourcefulness and imagination know no bounds (or boundaries, as when she creates a marker masterpiece on the wall instead of on her easel, or tests her scientific theories — and your patience — about what floats in the potty and what doesn’t).

And speaking of potties, your 2-year-old may be showing all the signs that she’s ready to get the potty party started … or none. If you’re thinking it may be time to ditch the diapers, ask the doctor for some potty-training pointers.

But keep in mind that many kids, especially boys, won’t be ready to hop on the potty-training train until age 3 — and there’s no point in pushing. Here’s what else you and your doctor will review at the 2-year well-baby visit.

The physical checkup

The doctor will once again complete a full physical examination and a check of those teeth, which will most likely include a full set of first molars. Most pediatricians will recommend a visit to the dentist, even if there are no dental concerns, but especially if there are.

Developmental milestones

“What’s that?” may be your eager learner’s favorite phrase — and she may ask it repeatedly even when she knows exactly what “that” is. That’s because it’s satisfying to ask questions and get answers. Your toddler’s brain is buzzing with activity and beginning to make sense of abstract concepts like “more” and “less.”

At this checkup your doctor will be keeping an eye out for plenty of exciting milestones, which may include:

  • Saying more than 50 words
  • Putting two to four words together in a sentence
  • Repeating words (watch what you say!)
  • Following two-step commands (“pick up the giraffe and hand it to me, please”)
  • Copying adults (“talking” on the phone, for example) and older kids
  • Singing
  • Jumping with both feet, kicking or throwing a ball
  • Naming or identifying many body parts
  • Naming familiar people
  • Scribbling lines and “circles” with crayons
  • Stacking four or more blocks
  • Playing make-believe
  • Playing alongside other kids
  • Turning pages and identifying objects and people in pictures

Remember, every child acquires new skills at her own unique pace — and there’s a wide range of what’s considered normal when it comes to development. If you’re concerned about something in your toddler’s development or if you just have a nagging feeling something’s not quite right, speak up.

Also check in if your 2-year-old doesn’t communicate in two-word phrases, doesn’t know how to use familiar items (like a hairbrush, spoon or phone), doesn’t copy words or actions, doesn’t follow simple instructions, doesn’t show emotion appropriately or loses skills she has mastered.

2-year shots

For most toddlers, the days of early childhood immunizations are nearly over — and that’s definitely something to celebrate. If your child missed a shot at a previous visit (for example, hepatitis B, DTaP or IPV), your doctor will get her caught up.

Otherwise, the only remaining shots recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that may be needed are hepatitis A (if your child hasn’t already had the second of the two-shot series) and the influenza vaccine (if it’s around flu season). Your doctor will also do a quick blood draw to check for certain conditions, like anemia, lead exposure and high cholesterol.

Questions to ask your doctor

As you watch your baby blossom into a talking, walking person, you may have more questions than ever. Here are a few to consider asking:

  • When should I switch from whole milk to non- or low-fat?
  • When should I think about preschool for my toddler?
  • How do I help my child express her feelings with words instead of throwing tantrums?
  • My child is scared of the dark. How can I help her work through it?
  • Could she be having nightmares already? Sometimes she wakes up screaming.
  • How much TV or screen time is okay for my child now?
  • Should I be trying to teach her letters and numbers?
  • She doesn’t like to sit still for books. Should I just not bother anymore?
  • When I try to brush her teeth, she clamps her mouth shut. Can I just ask her to brush her own teeth?

Believe it or not, the time of frequent well-baby visits has come to an end, and you won’t need to take your child for another checkup until she turns 2 1/2. And after that, it’s on to just a single yearly well visit (unless she’s sick).

Baby’s 2-Year Checkup: What to Expect

This is a busy time! Your toddler is running and climbing. They can say up to 50 words (or even more) and may be putting 2 words together into a simple sentence. It can also be a challenging time. Your child may be moody, easily frustrated, and testing rules. Being consistent with discipline should help. Talk about any concerns that you may have with your pediatrician.

Here’s what to expect at your toddler’s 2-year checkup.

You Can Expect Your Pediatrician to:

Weigh and measure your child Perform a physical exam of your child

Catch up on any vaccines

Questions Your Pediatrician May Ask

  • Is your child physically active?
  • What words are they learning?
  • Do they respond to 2-step commands?

Questions You May Have About Eating and Nutrition

  • Is it normal that my child is a picky eater?
  • How much fat should my child be eating?
  • How will I know if my toddler is overweight?

Eating and Nutrition Tips

  • Try to eat meals together at the dinner table and not in front of the TV. A family that eats together grows together! Family dinners are a great way to promote bonding and health.
  • Give your child a variety of nutritious foods like vegetables, fruits, and dairy products.
  • Let your child feed themselves and choose what they eat.
  • If your child doesn’t like a particular food, keep offering it. They may change their mind later.
  • At this stage, your child should be eating about 3 meals and 2 healthy snacks a day.
  • Don’t worry if your child doesn’t eat much at times. Most of the time, it should balance out.
  • This is a good time to start making the transition to 2% or 1% milk.

Questions You May Have About Physical Activity

  • How much exercise do toddlers need?
  • My child likes to sit and play quietly. How can I get them to be more active?

Physical Activity Tips

  • Give your child plenty of opportunities to be active.
  • Learning how to throw, kick, and catch builds physical confidence.
  • Play together as much as possible and make fun the top priority.
  • Be active as a family. It’s a great way to spend time together while moving your bodies!
  • Limit the amount of TV your toddler watches.
  • Remember that toddlers learn by your example. So make sure to set a good one!

2-Year Checkup: Your Toddler at 2 Years

This visit will probably go more smoothly than the 18-month one because your 2-year-old will be more interested in the whole business. It’s easier and more enjoyable for her to talk to the doctor or nurse who examines her.

At This Visit, Your Provider Will Probably:

  • Weigh and measure your child.
  • Provide insights into your child’s physical and emotional development.
  • Answer any questions you may have about surviving the “terrible twos.”
  • Discuss toilet training, preschool, and child care.

Your Provider Will Want To Know:

  • Has your child seen another healthcare provider since the last visit? If so, why? What was the outcome of that visit, and were any medications or treatments prescribed?
  • How many words does your toddler know? Can she use two-word phrases?
  • Does she imitate you? Does she play with trucks or dolls?
  • Can she kick a ball? Can she walk up and down the stairs using both feet or one foot at a time?
  • Is she shy around strangers, at least at first?
  • Can she follow a story and name pictures in a book?
  • Can she follow a two-step command?
  • Is there a family history of heart attacks before age 50? If so, there may be some testing of your child’s fat balance that needs to be done at this time.
  • Is she extremely fearful and/or does she have a hard time with other children?

Talk It Over

  • Although most 2-year-olds are not potty-trained (no matter what your mother or mother-in-law says), you may have started the training process. Keep in mind that you shouldn’t rush toilet training. Forcing the matter usually ends up frustrating everyone, and doesn’t get the diapers off any sooner.
  • Dental care is a big concern at this age. Ask for a referral to someone who works well with children. Ask about fluoride.
  • If you’re having a hard time limiting TV or screen time or if you find yourself using it as a babysitter, ask for some help. Habits are shaped now.
  • If your child is extremely fearful and/or has a hard time with other children, ask for advice.
  • Major changes can stress you and affect your toddler. If you’re moving, having a new baby, going back to work, or dealing with a loss or serious illness, your child may be affected. Your provider may also be able to suggest resources for you and your family to help with the situation.
  • There are many programs that can help you cope with the challenges you face with a growing child. Your provider can help you find one.

Speak Up!

Your busy toddler will probably bruise his shins and bump his head. If you have any concerns about your child’s injuries, tell your provider immediately. She or he can look at the bumps and bruises and tell you whether they appear to be from normal activities.

Also, Let Your Healthcare Provider Know if Your Child:

  • Isn’t putting together two-word sentences or phrases.
  • Doesn’t point at pictures in books and name at least some of the pictured objects.
  • Doesn’t run or is very unsteady on his feet.
  • Doesn’t understand two-step commands such as “Get your shoes and bring them to me.”
  • Doesn’t throw or kick a ball.
  • Can’t stack more than two blocks.
  • Doesn’t know how to scribble on paper with large crayons. Most kids can draw a crude circle at this age.
  • Still has trouble swallowing table food.
  • Can’t be understood or get his message across to strangers half of the time.
  • Is very fearful generally, or in particular situations or with particular people.
  • Is doing anything that you think is odd or unusual.
  • Remember that all children develop and learn at their own pace, and try not to worry.
  • Discuss any questions with your healthcare provider to ensure all is going well for your little one.

Your Child’s Checkup: 2 Years (24 Months)

What to Expect During This Visit

Your doctor and/or nurse will probably:

1. Check your child’s weight, height, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. Your doctor will also calculate and plot your child’s body mass index (BMI).

2. Administer a screening (test) that helps with the early identification of autism.

3. Ask questions, address concerns, and provide guidance about how your toddler is:

Eating. Don’t be surprised if your toddler skips meals occasionally or loves something one day and won’t touch it the next. Schedule three meals and two or three nutritious snacks a day. You’re in charge of the menu, but let your child be in charge of how much of it he or she eats.

Peeing and pooping. Most children are ready to begin potty training between 2 and 3 years. You may have noticed signs your child is ready to start potty training, including:

  • showing interest in the toilet (watching a parent or sibling in the bathroom, sitting on potty chair)
  • staying dry for longer periods
  • pulling pants down and up with assistance
  • connecting feeling of having to go with peeing and pooping
  • communicating that diaper is wet or dirty

Sleeping. Generally 2-year-olds need about 11 to 14 hours of sleep a day, including one nap.

Developing. By 2 years, it’s common for many children to:

  • say more than 50 words
  • put two words together to form a sentence (“I go!”)
  • be understood at least half the time
  • follow a two-step command (“Pick up the ball and bring it to me.”)
  • run well
  • kick a ball
  • walk down stairs
  • make lines and circular scribbles
  • play alongside other children

4. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, tooth exam, listening to the heart and lungs, and paying attention to your toddler’s motor skills, use of language, and behavior.

5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it’s important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect.

6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child’s risk for lead exposure, anemia, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed.

Looking Ahead

Here are some things to keep in mind until your child’s next checkup at 30 months:

  • Feeding
    • Food “jags” are common during the toddler years. Even if your child seems to get stuck on one food, continue to offer a variety of nutritious choices.
    • Let your child decide what to eat, and when he or she is full. Serve healthy snacks and avoid sugary drinks.
    • Switch to low-fat or nonfat milk, or a fortified-milk alternative like almond or soy milk. Offer dairy products that are low-fat or nonfat.
    • Limit juice to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day.
  • Learning
    • Toddlers learn by interacting with parents, caregivers, and their environment. Limit screen time (TV, computers, tablets, or other screens) to no more than 1–2 hours a day of quality children’s programming. Watch with your child.
    • Have a safe play area and allow plenty of time for exploring and active play. Play often together.
    • Read to your child every day.
  • Routine Care & Safety
    • Let your child brush his or her teeth with your guidance. Twice a day, use a small amount of toothpaste (about the size of a pea) with a soft toothbrush. Go over any areas that may have been missed. If you haven’t already, schedule a dentist visit.
    • Look for the signs that your child is ready to start potty training. If he or she doesn’t show interest, it’s OK to wait before trying again. A child who uses the potty and is accident-free during the day may still need a diaper at night.
    • Set reasonable and consistent rules. Use praise to encourage good behavior and be positive when redirecting unwanted behavior
    • Tantrums are common at this age, and tend to be worse when children are tired or hungry. Try to head off tantrums before they happen — find a distraction or remove your child from frustrating situations.
    • Don’t spank your child. Children don’t make the connection between spanking and the behavior you’re trying to correct. You can use a brief time-out to discipline your toddler.
    • Keep your child in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the highest weight or height limit allowed by the seat’s manufacturer. Previous advice was to turn kids around by age 2. Now, safety experts say to do this based on a child’s size, not age. So, small children can stay rear-facing until age 3 or 4.
    • Watch your child closely when playing outside and on playground equipment. Make sure your child always wears a helmet when riding a tricycle or is in a seat on an adult bicycle.
    • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
    • Talk to your doctor if you’re concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
    • These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.

24-Month Check-Up Pediatrician Questions

Here are some 2-year-old check-up questions to ask your pediatrician at the 24- to 36-month stage in your toddler’s development.

As your toddler grows, each development brings new questions and curiosities. We’ve compiled a list of commonly asked questions in a 2-year-old check-up questionnaire you might want to consult before you see your pediatrician.

2-year Check-up Questionnaire

  • How does my child’s growth plot on the charts?
  • Can you explain body-mass index (BMI) to me?
  • Does my child need vitamins?
  • How much milk should my child drink at this age?
  • How can I get my picky eater to eat better?
  • Are there particular foods I should avoid or make sure my child eats?
  • Are there indicators of developmental issues I should watch out for?
  • Are there indicators of autism I should be looking for? How much sleep does my 2-year-old need?
  • How long should my child nap each day?
  • How many naps should my toddler take in a day?
  • What’s a good bedtime?
  • Is it okay for adults to speak more than one language around my child?
  • What’s the best way to handle temper tantrums?
  • Are there particular toys or games you’d recommend for this developmental stage?
  • How can I encourage toilet training and what do I do if my child shows no interest?
  • Can you refer me to a pediatric or family dentist?

Other Toddler Matters:

Their 24-month check-up might be a good time to ask about personality questions or persistent problems you’ve noticed with your toddler. Or if you want to ask advice on a range of other parenting topics. For instance:

  • Your child’s personality—if your child’s overly clingy or hyperactive
  • Persistent problems, such as if your toddler awakens during the night or is excessively fearful
  • Concerns about discipline and tactics to try, such as time-out or logical consequences
  • Advice on getting your child ready for a new sibling
  • Advice about getting ready to start day care or preschool

These, of course, are just a few questions that might be on your mind. If you have other concerns, make sure to write them down so you don’t forget to ask. When it comes to your toddler’s nutrition, here are a few more things you might want to know.

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM YOUR 2 YEAR OLD CHILD’S CHECK UP


When you have a child, they are monitored by the NHS for the first two years of their life through a series of health checks.

These take place for all children in the UK, so your toddler having these checks is not a sign that anything is wrong and they are absolutely nothing to worry about. They are just a way to check if everything is OK and that your child is developing as expected.

The last one of these checks takes place at the age of 2. It doesn’t take long, and won’t hurt or distress your child. If there are any problems, then your health visitor will be able to advise on further steps and possible treatment.

Here’s our guide on what to expect from a 2 year old toddler check up – and what you need to do.

WHEN EXACTLY DOES THE TWO-YEAR CHILD DEVELOPMENT CHECK TAKE PLACE?

The 2 year-old health visitor check up will take place some time after your little one’s second birthday. This could be up to six months after they turn 2.

DO I HAVE TO TAKE MY CHILD TO THE CHECK UP?

If it takes place outside the home, then yes, you’ll need to take your child there – and stay with them while the check takes place. And ideally both parents should attend, as you may both have different questions and concerns.

WHAT HAPPENS AT THE TWO-YEAR CHILD DEVELOPMENT CHECK?

As with all the checks you have, the 2 year old health visitor check up is designed to monitor your child’s progress. It’s a chance for your health visitor to discuss and assess your baby’s health and development. The 2 year-old check up is also your chance to ask questions about anything that is concerning you – or raise any specific concerns you have about your little one’s development.

WHO WILL THE CHECK UP BE WITH AND WHERE WILL IT BE?

A nursery nurse or health visitor will normally conduct your two year child development check. It could be at your home, at a baby clinic, or a children’s centre. Or – if your little one goes to a nursery or childminder’s – you may do your review there. If so, you’ll complete the review with your child’s keyworker or childminder in attendance, as well as a health visitor.

WHAT EXACTLY IS CHECKED DURING THE TWO-YEAR CHILD DEVELOPMENT CHECK?

This review will cover the general development of your little one, such as how they see, speak, hear and move. Their behaviour and social skills will also be checked and your child’s vaccination record will be updated. In addition, you will get advice on dental care, safety, and how to manage behaviour and help your child to sleep well.

WHAT DO I NEED TO DO BEFORE THE REVIEW?

Your health visitor will send you the ‘Ages and Stages Questionnaire’, or ASQ-3, which you will need to complete. This questionnaire covers areas such as your child’s speech and understanding, motor skills, problem solving and social skills. You know your child best and the completed questionnaire will allow your health visitor to understand how your child is developing and whether they need any extra help or assessment.

If you have trouble filling in the ASQ-3, then you can ask your health visitor, keyworker or childminder for help when you have your review.

You must also make sure you have your ‘red book’ – the personal child health record (PCHR) you were given after your little one was born – with you. Whoever does the two-year child development check will use it to record your little one’s weight and height, and update vaccination records and other important information.

Doctor visit: The two-year checkup

You can expect your child’s doctor to:

  • Weigh and measure your child to make sure she’s growing at a healthy rate. \Check her heart and breathing.
  • Check her eyes and ears.
  • Measure your toddler’s head size to keep track of her brain growth.
  • Give your child any immunizations she missed at her previous checkups.
  • Address any concerns about your child’s health, including how to spot symptoms of ear infections, colds, and the flu.
  • Answer any questions you may have about toilet training, discipline, or, if your child has brothers or sisters, sibling rivalry.
  • Offer insight into your child’s development, temperament, and behavior.
  • Screen for anemia and lead poisoning with a blood test if your child has any risk factors.
  • Ask about plans for preschool or organized activities.
  • Watch your child walk to check her gait and coordination.

Questions the doctor may ask:

  • How is your child sleeping? Most kids this age sleep about 11 hours at night and nap for about two hours during the day. Some kids may have given up naps altogether, preferring instead to sleep in one long nighttime stretch. If your child has been waking up with nightmares, tell your doctor. Nightmares and night terrors are common at this stage, but your doctor may suggest ways you can comfort your child.
  • How is your child eating? Until now you may have been able to limit the amount of sugary foods your child eats, but as he spends more time around other kids – in daycare or at playdates, for example – he’s probably becoming more interested in sampling junk food. If you find yourself constantly battling his sweet tooth, speak to the doctor, who may have some healthy snack suggestions for you or may be able to ease your concerns about your child’s diet.
  • How is toilet training going? Most kids have started toilet training at this point, although many haven’t mastered it yet. Your doctor may have some advice on easing the transition out of diapers.
  • Have you noticed anything unusual about the way your child walks? Many children walk knock-kneed at this age because their legs are still developing, but the problem usually resolves itself around age 7. Is your child physically active? By now a toddler has more control over his arms and legs, and is better coordinated overall. He should be able to kick a ball effortlessly, build block towers, climb furniture, jump, and walk up and down stairs. Make sure he has plenty of opportunities to move and explore.
  • What new words is he learning? Most kids this age have discovered the word “why.” Sometimes all he wants is an explanation, and other times he’s merely trying to continue his conversation with you. His vocabulary is expanding, and he’ll be trying out new words every day. The doctor may test your child’s language abilities by asking him questions. Two-year-olds typically have a vocabulary of 50 to 100 words and are starting to put two words together.
  • Does he respond to two-step commands? Two-year-olds are usually mature enough to understand and follow two-step directions such as “Go to your room and grab your bear” or “Go to Daddy and give him a hug.” If your child doesn’t follow your commands, or appears not to hear you, tell the doctor.
  • What games does he like to play? The activities your child enjoys give the doctor insight into how he’s developing. Many kids this age enjoy putting together simple puzzles, scribbling on paper, sorting objects by color, and filling and emptying boxes.
  • Have you noticed anything unusual about your child’s eyes or the way he looks at things? Learn about eye examinations and how to spot potential problems.
  • Has he seen a dentist? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children see a dentist after their first birthday. If your child hasn’t been to the dentist yet, now is the time.

View Sources

Your Child’s Checkup: 2 Years (24 Months)

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The 2-Year (24-Month) Well-Baby Visit

https://www.whattoexpect.com/toddler/health-and-safety/24-month-well-baby-visit/

Baby’s 2-Year Checkup: What to Expect

https://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/babys-2-year-checkup-what-to-expect

2-Year Checkup: Your Toddler at 2 Years

https://www.pampers.com/en-us/toddler/health/article/2-year-checkup-your-toddler-at-2-years

Your Child’s Checkup: 2 Years (24 Months)

https://www.connecticutchildrens.org/health-library/en/parents/checkup-2yrs/

24-Month Check-Up Pediatrician Questions

https://www.enfamil.com/articles/24-month-check-up-pediatrician-questions/

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM YOUR 2 YEAR OLD CHILD’S CHECK UP

https://www.emmasdiary.co.uk/baby/baby-health-and-illnesses/two-year-old-checkup

Doctor visit: The two-year checkup

https://www.babycenter.com/doctor-visit-worksheet-two-year-checkup